Girish Gupta

HOME

PHOTOS

VENEZUELA ECON

ONLINE

Twitter
Instagram
Facebook
LinkedIn
AngelList
Keybase
GitHub
IFTTT

BY COUNTRY

Afghanistan
Brazil
Colombia
Cuba
Ecuador
Egypt
Guyana
Iraq
Jordan
Lebanon
Mexico
United Kingdom
Venezuela

BY MEDIUM

Text
Photo
Radio
TV/Video

BY PUBLISHER

Al Jazeera
BBC
BuzzFeed
CBC
Christian Science Monitor
CNN
Daily Mail
Data Driven Journalism (EJC)
Datum
Ecologist
Economist Intelligence Unit
Emerging Markets
Financial Times
Foreign Policy
France 24
Fusion
GlobalPost
Guardian
Independent
La Prensa (Panama)
LatinFinance
Mancunion
Monocle
National (Abu Dhabi)
New Internationalist
New Statesman
New York Times
New Yorker
NPR
PBS
PRI
Radio France Internationale
Reuters
RTE
Sky News
Sun
Sunday Times
Telegraph
TIME
Times of London
USA Today
Vice
WLRN

ABOUT

About
CV
Contact (PGP Key)


Afghans believe country headed in wrong direction, but optimism rising slightly - survey
Nov. 14, 2017 — Kabul, Afghanistan

More than 60 percent of Afghans still believe the country is headed in the wrong direction, but signs of better governance and rebuilding has slightly lifted the national mood, according to a survey by the Asia Foundation.

Just over half of the 10,000 people surveyed said they had confidence in President Ashraf Ghani’s government, which has struggled to establish security in the face of a growing Taliban insurgency. Last year, just under half of Afghans said they had confidence in Ghani.

However, nearly 39 percent of those surveyed said they would be willing to leave if they had the opportunity, the second highest figure in the survey’s more than decade-long history.

The main reason was increased security concerns. More than 70 percent of Afghans fear for their personal safety.

Attacks are up across the country. In May, more than 150 people were killed by a blast in Kabul’s diplomatic zone - one of the deadliest since the Taliban’s ouster in 2001.

On the day the survey was released, more than 20 policemen were killed in fighting with Taliban insurgents in the southern province of Kandahar.

The survey which was conducted in all 34 provinces of Afghanistan in July, primarily in rural households, pointed to a mixed picture, with steady gains in education and health over the past decade and a half matched by continuing concern over corruption, unemployment and security.

Around a third of Afghans, or 33 percent, believe the country was heading in a positive direction, up slightly from 29.3 percent last year to buck a years-long declining trend.

“After a historic decline in 2016, confidence in public institutions has slightly improved; growing confidence in the Afghan National Security Forces stabilised in 2017,” Abdullah Ahmadzai, Asia Foundation’s country representative in Afghanistan said in a statement.

The increase in optimism applied across ethnic groups except Uzbeks, who make an important minority in Pashtun- and Tajik-dominated Afghanistan.

While there was a slight rise in positive sentiment, it was down significantly from a peak in 2013 before the withdrawal of most foreign forces. Back then nearly 60 percent of Afghans were positive about their future.

The survey comes as the United States in August announced a boost in U.S. troops to Afghanistan, which could push optimism higher in the coming months.

Filed from
Kabul, Afghanistan






More...

U.S. strikes on Taliban opium labs won't work, say Afghan farmers
Nov. 23, 2017


Afghanistan's economy slowly on rise, to grow 2.6 percent this year - World Bank
Nov. 21, 2017


U.S., Afghan forces strike opium factories to curb Taliban funds
Nov. 20, 2017


Afghans believe country headed in wrong direction, but optimism rising slightly - survey
Nov. 14, 2017








© Girish Gupta